News

From Our Facebook Page

I’ve been emailed several images relating to a once very well known police officer of Angus Constabulary, namely a Sergeant Sid Kippen who was stationed in several local towns between the 1930s and the 1960s. The sender, his son who now lives in Australia, has also provided several wonderful anecdotes relating to his experience growing up in Kirrie as the local Sergeant’s son, and a brilliant story about Winston Churchill’s daughter Sarah, a frequent visitor to Kirriemuir, by all accounts a bit of a wild lass and no stranger to the police station! Lots of new stories to share with our visitors when we re-open to the public Easter 2018. Looking forward to it!

Visit our FaceBook page to see the photos.

Police Scotland Youth Volunteers Visit Us

 

On both 1st and 15th June 2017, Arbroath’s Police Scotland Youth Volunteers visited the Tayside Police Museum in Kirriemuir as part of their continuing commitment to understanding Policing in their local area.

During their visit, PSYV Arbroath were guided through the decades by retired officers Hamish Gray and George Morgan who between them have over 60 years of Policing experience in the local area.

The Youth Volunteers had a great time learning about the history of Policing in their area and were surprised to find that the origins of Policing in their own town of Arbroath were first established as far back as 1836. Delving further back in time, they also found out that Policing in Perth can be traced back to 1811, 18 years before Sir Robert Peel established the ‘Bow Street Runners’ in London.

Many of the artefacts caught the attention of the Youth Volunteers, particularly the birching bench which was used during the whipping of young male offenders in days gone by!!

The team also got to meet two permanent residents of the museum, namely Oor Wullie and PC Murdoch who didn’t appear too impressed with Youth Volunteer Sam’s new uniform.

A huge ‘Thank You’ to Hamish and George for taking the time to speak to PSYV Arbroath about the museum and its heritage.

 

Abroath Trefoil Guild Visit

We recently received a visit from a party from the Arbroath Trefoil Guild.  Subsequently the following item appeared in the local paper, the Arbroath Herald.

The March meeting of the Arbroath Trefoil Guild was an afternoon with a difference.  Members met at the Forfar Driving Range coffee shop where a light lunch was enjoyed before continuing to Kirriemuir where a guided tour of the Tayside Police Museum had been arranged. The museum is located on the ground floor of Kirriemuir Police Station and boasts a very comprehensive exhibition of all aspects of policing from the early 1800s through to the 1980s in Dundee City, Perth & Kinross, and Angus. The museum is run by volunteers and our two guides were fantastic, making the visit even more interesting and most enjoyable.
Although it was extremely windy it was a lovely day for the drive both there and back – the countryside looked beautiful with new growth and newly ploughed fields – also some lovely views over the County.  Our next meeting is on 11th April in Arbroath Girlguiding HQ at 2 o’clock when there will be a speaker from Project Linus UK.

It was very gratifying to hear how much they had enjoyed their day out and how our volunteers had made their visit even more interesting and enjoyable.

Another Post on Trip Advisor

5 of 5 starsReviewed 1 week ago

I visited the recently opened Tayside Police Museum today. The exhibition rooms are actually within the old Kirriemuir Police Station, so authenticity is the watch word. The first room we visited was a former police cell, which had last been used just 5 years ago. Exhibits include fascinating drugs paraphenalia; horrific home-made weapons confiscated in Dundee; collections of uniforms, bravery and sporting awards, and more truncheons than you can shake a stick at. 🙂 The older items evoke an era when policing was much more community based, and it is sad that this has passed.

The volunteer guide was absolutely brilliant and she brought everything to life with just the right amount of detail. We actually arrived half-an-hour after the closing time by mistake, and she generously invited us in when she saw us standing dejected on the door step.

The is more than just a museum, it is a repository for community memory – and tales of former policemen in the Kirriemuir area were exchanged with joy between the guide and my friends.

To my great surprise, given I have no particular interest in the police, the visit was genuinely interesting, and would recommend everyone, both young and old, to pop-in.

Oh yes, it’s free!

Visited October 2016

A Commendation on Trip Advisor

5 of 5 starsReviewed 1 week ago

We spent a pleasant morning in Kirriemuir on Saturday 6th August. On our way to Barrie’s birthplace we came across the Police Museum and decided to have a quick look. We were treated to a personal guided tour of the museum by one of the volunteers. It was really enjoyable and so much more interesting than just reading the labels on the exhibits. Some of the other volunteers are ex policeman and our guide was able to share some of their anecdotes, some of her own and information which other visitors had shared with them. There is a surprisingly large number of exhibits and photographs for the size of the museum. At the end we were allowed to try on the hats and get a photo in the cell next to Oor Wullie and PC Plod. It was good fun for us (three adults) and I am sure it would be even more appealing to families with children! Thanks Marilyn. (NB The museum is free)

Visited August 2016

Recent Visitors

So far over 400 people have visited the museum including a visit from MSP Graeme Dey pictured on the  left below…

TPM Graeme Dey sm

A considerable variety of people have visited the Museum since the opening, including a seven year old who was completely enthralled by the experience, historians and especially retired police officers.

The volunteers who man the Museum on a daily basis are mostly retired police officers and so visits from former colleagues work both ways as the visitors are often able to provide more background information but also enjoy the mutual banter.

Visiting Groups

Groups of all ages and interests are finding the Museum a very engaging destination.

History clubs, Tuesday clubs and a number of groups of young people such as Cub Scouts have all found something to catch their attention.

To arrange a visit use the contact form on this website or email curator@taysidepolicemuseum.org.uk